The Hinckley Institute of Politics Hall of Fame honors distinguished individuals who have made an outstanding contribution to politics and public service in the State of Utah. 


Norman H. Bangerter was inducted into the Hinckley Institute of Politics Hall of Fame on April 12, 1996. Mr. Bangerter attended Brigham Young University and the University of Utah . He was a major contractor in Utah 's home building and real estate development industries. He was a member of the Utah State House of Representatives for 10 years, including four years as Speaker. He was Utah's thirteenth governor, serving from 1985 to 1993. Mr. Bangerter significantly improved the state's education system and economic development programs during his tenure as governor. Mr. Bangerter resumed his private business activities following his retirement from public service.


Wallace F. Bennett was inducted into the Hinckley Institute of Politics Hall of Fame on April 12, 1996. Mr. Bennett attended the University of Utah and later participated in World War I as an infantry officer. He was president of the Bennett Motor Company and the National Association of Manufacturers. Mr. Bennett represented the State of Utah in the United States Senate from 1951 to 1975. He was a ranking member of the Senate Finance Committee and played a major role in establishing the defense and aerospace industries in Utah. Mr. Bennett resumed his private business activities following his retirement from public service.


Scott M. Matheson was inducted into the Hinckley Institute of Politics Hall of Fame on April 12, 1996. Mr. Matheson graduated from the University of Utah and Stanford Law School. He served in several legal positions, including Deputy Salt Lake County Attorney, legal counsel to the Union Pacific Railroad Company and President of the Utah State Bar. He was Utah's twelfth governor, holding office from 1977 to 1985. Mr. Matheson was a strong supporter of public education and an effective advocate for the state against federal action during his tenure as governor. Mr. Matheson entered into private law practice in Salt Lake City following his public service career.


Frank E. Moss was inducted into the Hinckley Institute of Politics Hall of Fame on April 12, 1996 . Mr. Moss graduated from the University of Utah and George Washington University Law School. He was elected a judge in the Salt Lake City Municipal Court and later participated in World War II as a member of the J.A.G. corps. Mr. Moss represented the State of Utah as a member of the United State Senate from 1959 to 1977. He was an expert on water issues and supported the creation of additional national parks inside Utah. Mr. Moss also sponsored significant consumer protection legislation, including the Product Safety Act and Poison Prevention Packaging Act.


Calvin L. Rampton was inducted into the Hinckley Institute of Politics Hall of Fame on April 12, 1996 . Mr. Rampton received both his undergraduate and law degrees from the University of Utah . He was Davis County Attorney, Assistant Attorney General for Utah and Chief of the Senior U.S. Army Claims Commission during World War II. Mr. Rampton was Utah 's eleventh and longest-serving governor, holding office from 1964 to 1977. While in office, he reorganized Utah 's state governmental structure and made substantial investments in Utah 's public and higher education systems. Mr. Rampton left public office to enter private law practice in Salt Lake City.


James V. Hansen was inducted into the Hinckley Institute of Politics Hall of Fame on January 27, 2003 . Following his service in the Korean War, Mr. Hansen received an undergraduate degree from the University of Utah. He was a member of the Utah State House of Representatives for seven years and its Speaker from 1979 to 1980. Mr. Hansen represented Utah in the United States House of Representatives from 1981 to 2003. He was a strong advocate of multiple-use development of natural resources on public lands. Mr. Hansen served as a ranking member on several House committees and used his influence to maintain and promote Utah's defense and aerospace industries.


Olene S. Walker was inducted into the Hinckley Institute of Politics Hall of Fame on March 10, 2005 . Ms. Walker received undergraduate, master's and doctoral degrees from Brigham Young University, Stanford University, and the University of Utah, respectively. She served in the Utah State House of Representatives where she held the position of majority whip. Ms. Walker was later elected to be Utah's first female Lieutenant Governor. She also served as the fifteenth and first female governor of the state from 2003 to 2005. Ms. Walker made significant contributions in the areas of education, literacy, housing, and tax policy during her tenure as governor.


Wayne Owens was inducted into the Hinckley Institute of Politics Hall of Fame on April 12, 2007. Wayne Owens represented the State of Utah in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1972-1974 and again from 1986-1992. Mr. Owens received his law degree from the University of Utah. He walked 711 miles through Utah to win the seat in 1972. Once in office, he voted to stop funding the Vietnam War and impeach Richard Nixon, and championed many environmental causes, compensation for "downwinders," and peace in the Middle East. After leaving Congress, he co-founded and served for ten years as president of the Center for Middle East Peace and Economic Cooperation.


Lieutenant General Brent Scowcroft was inducted into the Hinckley Institute of Politics Hall of Fame on October 23, 2008. Brent Scowcroft served as Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs to Presidents Gerald Ford and George H. W. Bush. He also served as Military Assistant to President Richard Nixon and as Deputy Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs to Presidents Ford and Nixon.  He founded The Forum for International Policy, a non-partisan, non-profit organization that provides independent analyses and perspectives on major foreign policy issues. He is also President of The Scowcroft Group, Inc., an international business advisory firm.  He has been awarded hundreds of military and policy recognitions, including the Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award.